Tag Archives: HCV

Absolute Denial of HCV DAA Treatment Not Only Common, But Rising

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

The high cost of curing Hepatitis C (HCV) with newer Direct-Acting Antiviral (DAA) drugs has been the fodder of many an article since their introduction into the commercial market in 2013 with Sovaldi (Gilead) and Olysio (Janssen). When Harvoni (Gilead) entered the market in 2014, its Wholesale Acquisition Cost (WAC) of $94,500 for 12 weeks of treatment, it was dubbed “The $1,000-a-Day Pill” by the media and a Congressional investigation was launched in the U.S. State Medicaid programs insisted that treating everyone with HCV on their rolls would not only obliterate their pharmacy budgets, but do so exponentially.

Gilead Sciences tried to do their part by offering a manufacturer Patient Assistance Program (PAP) that offered drastically reduced or free fills on these prescriptions if patients were denied coverage by Medicaid, Medicare, or their private insurer. That program was quickly inundated by patients whose payors instructed them to “…go and get it for free from Gilead.” By 2015, Gilead was forced to restrict the PAP to only the uninsured and those whose insurance denied coverage.

Now, new research published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases has found that, between 2014-2017, 52.4% patients with private insurance who were prescribed DAAs to treat their HCV infection were absolutely denied treatment (defined as “a lack of fill approval by the insurer”). In addition 34.5% of patients on Medicaid were denied, and a paltry 14.7% of patients with Medicare insurance were denied (Gowda, et al, 2018). These findings are compounded by similar research conducted regarding HCV treatment in correctional settings that found less than 1% of inmates infected with HCV in state correctional facilities were receiving treatment (Paukstis, 2018).

denied square red grunge stamp

Photo Source: emdlaw.com

This appalling record of absolute denials of treatment are a large part of why the U.S. has fallen behind comparable nations in achieving the elimination goals set forth by the World Health Organization in 2016, calling for the elimination of HCV as a public health crisis by the year 2030. Worse, these denials have come as the cost of treatment has dropped dramatically, from its high point with Harvoni, to its lowest point with AbbVie’s Mavyret, which has a WAC of $26,400 for 8 weeks of treatment ($39,600 for 12 weeks). Moreover, Mavyret sports comparable Sustained Virologic Response (SVR – “cure”) rates to Sovaldi, Harvoni, and Epclusa (Gilead). Worse still is that the WAC is largely a useless price point, as the vast majority of payors enter into pricing negotiations with the drug manufacturers and receive discounts and rebates that reduce that cost to a mere percentage of the WAC.

And, yet…

America’s healthcare problems are all solvable…in we are willing to go on the offensive against the corporate interests that we’ve allowed to run roughshod over our nation’s healthcare system since the late 1970s. We have allowed private insurers, drug manufacturers, and other private entities to turn healthcare away from being a profession designed to cure people – a system that we, as a nation, helped to flourish and turned into the best in the world in the mid-1900s – and into a for-profit industry whose main priorities revolve around further enriching the already rich.

We can combat diseases like HCV; hell, we managed to eradicate polio in the U.S. by 1979 with a vaccine that was created in 1953 and came into commercial use in 1955, with an oral vaccine following in 1961.

Jonas Salk, the creator of the first polio vaccine, once told Edward R. Murrow, when asked who owned the patent for the vaccine, “Well, the people, I would say. There is no patent. Could you patent the sun?”

Since that time, countless business writers and corporate shills have derided Salk’s statement, going so far as to call it “Communist propaganda.” And, yet, it is because of Salk’s vaccine that we managed to eradicate polio in much of the modernized world.

We need to get back to this way of thinking, as it relates to healthcare. It’s time to pull the profits out of healthcare, altogether, and if that means dismantling the private insurance market, then so be it.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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Hepatitis C Death Rate High Among Uninsured and Medicaid Recipients

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

Researchers presenting at Digestive Disease Week found that, between 2000-2010, adult who were infected with Hepatitis C (HCV) were more likely to die if they were either uninsured, or recipients of Medicaid benefits (Basen, 2018). Being HCV-Positive correlated with higher mortality rates (10.4% compared to 3.1% for HCV-Negative patients).

The limitations of these data are several – (a.) the data are nearly a decade old; (b.) these HCV mortality rates are from an era where the only curative treatments for the disease had a treatment abandonment rate of between 40-80%, because the Pegylated-Interferon treatments were almost impossible to tolerate; (c.) an artifact of those older treatments was that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were not proactive about pushing HCV testing beyond the Birth Cohort (1945-1965).

While these data are nearing ten-years-old, they do reveal some interesting patterns that HEAL Blog has been contending for some time: (1.) Medicaid recipients were more likely to be infected with HCV than those with insurance; (2.) HCV infection rates were highest among the uninsured; (3.) HCV-Positive Medicaid recipients had higher rates of extra-hepatic (illnesses other than those affecting the liver) comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, and stroke.

Outpatient Medicaid Office

Photo Source: VinNews.com

Essentially, much like HIV, although neither disease discriminates against any class, color, or education level, those who are poorer, less educated, and minorities are disproportionately impacted by these fatal diseases. More to the point, there is no single rightway to deal with these issues; none of these issues exist in isolation:

  • less education correlates with and contributes to poverty, as well as leaving people less able to understand health risks and how to deal with any diseases they contract;
  • people who are impoverished tend to have less access to comprehensive (or even basic) healthcare services, and if they are poorly educated, they are less likely to utilize healthcare services, because they often don’t recognize symptoms of disease;
  • people who are have less access to healthcare services are likelier to develop chronic illnesses that prevent them from working, thereby increasing their likelihood of remaining in poverty.

Because these problems are interconnected, dealing with just one aspect is an ineffective approach – we cannot just address access to healthcare, because we’re not also addressing how people will pay for healthcare and treatment, nor are we considering the impact that accessing healthcare can have for people who have to miss hourly-wage jobs in order to access said care, and thus lose money, only to have to spend more money.

And, honestly, I don’t know what the answers in today’s America are. In a perfect world, we would have Universal Healthcare paid for by tax dollars that would low- to no-cost out-of-pocket, as well as expanded and affordable public transportation, higher wages, rent control, and free college and university paid for by taxes (like most of the rest of the modernized world). But, we don’t have those things, and it’s not likely we’re going to get those things any time soon.

In the meantime, looking at these data are a great way for us to craft policies to address these issues, particularly as new HCV infections are trending younger and younger, and younger people are less likely to be insured. Food for thought.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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AASLD & IDSA Release New Hepatitis C Guidance

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

The America Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) have released updated Hepatitis C (HCV) guidance for the “…rapid formulation and dissemination of evidence-based, expert-developed recommendations for Hepatitis C management” (HCV Guidelines [dot] Org, 2017).

Using the Guidance on Your Mobile Device

Photo Source: HCVGuidelines.org

The web-based portal was developed over the past few years by ASSLD and IDSA in an effort to address management issues ranging from testing and linkage to care to the optional treatment regimens in particular patient situations (HCV Guidelines). The latest recommendation updates include:

  • One-Time HCV Testing protocol recommendations that include testing for those with risk factors such as Injection Drug Use, Intranasal Drug Use, Users of Long-Term Hemodialysis, et cetera
  • Annual HCV Testing protocol recommendations for People Who Inject Drugs (PWIDs) and HIV-Positive Men who have Sex with Men (MSM)
  • Initial HCV Testing and Follow-Up recommendations that include initial antibody testing, HCV-RNA testing, HCV-RNA testing for those who are risk of reinfection after clearing, Quantitative HCV-RNA testing prior to initial antiviral therapy to determine baseline level of viremia, HCV genotype testing, and notification of no evidence of currently active HCV infection
  • Counseling recommendations for people who test positive for HCV
  • Recommendations that all people who test positive for HCV be linked to a clinician for comprehensive management (HCV Guidelines, 2018)

In addition to those testing updates, guidance is also provided for unique populations, including HIV/HCV co-infected populations, those with decompensated cirrhosis of the liver, patients who develop recurrent HCV infection after liver transplantation, renal impairment, pregnancy, pediatric patients, et cetera. These recommendations are vital for allowing providers to know how best to treat their patients, particularly in areas of the world where several comorbidities tend to exist.

The new guidelines also include guidance for the testing and treatment of HCV in correctional settings, a drum which HEAL Blog and the Community Access National Network in general has been banging for several years, now. These patients, in particular, are going to be a key population in the fight to end HCV and Viral Hepatitis, in general.

The latest guidelines can be found at the following website: https://www.hcvguidelines.org/.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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Hepatitis C in Native American Populations

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

In August 2017, HEAL Blog covered efforts by the Cherokee Nation to proactively combat Hepatitis C (HCV) within the tribe’s boundaries in Northeastern Oklahoma (Hopkins, 2017). The program, started three years ago, comprised several steps, including compulsory screening of all tribe members aged 20-69, expanding screening locations to include dental clinics, establishing a Syringe Services Program (SSP) within the tribe’s borders, and using Direct-Acting Antivirals (DAAs) to treat those infected with HCV. The tribe, itself, is absorbing the costs of treating its citizens (Juozapavicius, 2018).

Photo Source: HHS

Map of Cherokee Nation

According to the most recent report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), deaths related to HCV have been decreasing in every demographic since 2013, including in Native American (NA) populations. That said, NAs still had the highest rate of HCV-related death in 2016, with a rate of 10.75 (per 100,000), down from a staggering 12.95 in 2015 (CDC, 2018). These data indicate that, while the effort by the Cherokee Nation are certainly proving to be effective, there is still a lot of ground to cover.

As with other race demographics, the leading risk for HCV infection is Injection Drug Use (IDU). Doctor Jorge Mira, Director of Infectious Diseases for the Cherokee Nation, indicates in the Juozapavicius article that, over the past two years, he began hearing the word “heroin” more and more, every day. This trend of IDU is in line with other race demographics. The common factors across race demographics are high levels poverty and unemployment. In areas where these factors are present (particularly in rural settings), heroin use and IDU are almost a given.

The efforts to combat the disease within the Cherokee Nation need to be replicated at the state and Federal levels. The reality is that these problems are not going to go away, and in the areas where they’re most prevalent, they are going to get exponentially worse in the coming years. In the meantime, we can look to the Cherokee Nation for their leadership on the issue, and begin implementing them in small scale at the local level.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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Efficacy of Syringe Services Programs in Preventing the Spread of HCV

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

Over the past two weeks, HEAL Blog has covered two separate counties within the state of California that have taken two very different approaches to dealing with access to Syringe Services Programs (SSPs) and the prevention of the spread of diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis B (HBV), and Hepatitis C (HCV).

This past week, Here and Now, a program produced by WBUR, Boston’s National Public Radio (NPR) station, has also been covering issues related to SSPs in a series of interviews. These interviews included:

  • Chelsi Cheatom, Program Manager for Trac-B Exchange in Clark County, Nevada, which established the nation’s first syringe vending machine in Las Vegas, NV (Here and Now, 2018b);
  • Ricky Bluthenthal, Professor of Preventative Medicine at University of Southern California, who studies the efficacy of these programs (Here and Now, 2018a);
  • Danny Jones, Mayor of Charleston, West Virginia, who has led a very vocal campaign against the county health department’s Harm Reduction Clinic (Here and Now, 2018c)

Each of these interviews provides a set of perspectives that are very important to the discussion of SSPs, their efficacy, and their existence in the U.S. – an academic perspective that researches these issues and argues that data show these programs to be highly efficacious; a program worker who can attest to the successes and challenges of these programs; an elected official who must deal with and respond to the outcry and fallout of the very existence of SSPs creates in local settings. While each of these perspectives are important, it is Mayor Jones’ take on the issues in Charleston, WV with which I take issue.

Mayor Jones has, for the past five months, been waging a war against Kanawha County’s Harm Reduction Clinic, and he has, unfortunately, won. As of May 14th, the Clinic is now officially suspended by the state of West Virginia in response to an audit requested by Jones and Interim Health Officer Dr. Dominic Gaziano. The reasons for the suspension, and the findings of the audit, indicate that the clinic failed to build and maintain community support, lack of data indicating that drug users were actually informed of other programs (including treatment and recovery services), insufficient evidence to support the safe recovery and disposal of needles, and insufficient evidence regarding the total number and types of referrals made to drug treatment programs (Takitch & Hoak, 2018).

Kanawha-Charleston Health Department

Photo Source: WV Metro News

I began interviewing the head of the Kanawha County Clinic in September 2017 regarding the successes and challenges of establishing SSPs in the state of West Virginia. This Clinic, in particular, faced significant challenges because it served as one of only two public SSPs that served clients from 9 southern WV counties (Boone, Cabell, Kanawha, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, Mingo, Putnam, and Wayne). Since our conversation, two addition clinics have opened, but they are further East, and stilldo not serve those communities.

To put this into better perspective, here are some frightening statistics regarding HCV in those counties:

  • The rate of new Acute JBV infections in the state of West Virginia is 14.6 (per 100,000) – the highest rate in the nation
  • The rate of new HCV infections in the state of West Virginia is a staggering 7.2 (per 100,000) – the highest rate in the nation
  • The rates of HBV and HCV infection for the aforementioned counties are as follows (WVDHHR, 2018):
    • Boone – (HBV) – 34.2; (HCV) – 0.0
    • Cabell – (HBV) – 17.6; (HCV) – 10.3
    • Kanawha – (HBV) – 29.2; (HCV) – 14.9
    • Lincoln – (HBV) – 56.0; (HCV) – 0.0
    • Logan – (HBV) – 17.3; (HCV) – 8.6
    • Mason – (HBV) 25.9; (HCV) – 0.0
    • Mingo – (HBV) 31.6; (HCV) – 7.9
    • Putnam – (HBV) 28.1; (HCV) – 3.5
    • Wayne – (HBV) 14.6; (HCV) – 0.0
  • The state of West Virginia has an overall drug overdose death rate of 52.0 (per 100,000) – the highest rate in the nation
    • Roughly 86% of those overdose deaths were opioid-related
    • WV has the highest rate over opioid overdose deaths in the nation, with a rate of 44.9
    • These nine counties have the highest rates of drug overdose deaths in the state of West Virginia

To say that the burden placed upon the Kanawha/Putnam Harm Reduction Clinic was high is a gross understatement. If you notice the rate of HCV being lower in some counties, it’s because the state only requires that physicians offer HCV testing to people in the Birth Cohort (born 1945-1965) unless the physician knows about another risk factor in a patient, meaning that patients are disinclined to say they inject drugs. So, HCV cases very likely exist, there, but physicians are not required to test for it on a regular basis, which is dumb, given the high rates of Injection Drug Use in those counties.

In addition to serving essentially nine counties, the Clinic had to do so on a shoestring budget, as state law prohibits the use of funds for specific drug-related expenditures. They had to secure funding for syringes and disposal on their own, meaning significant time was spent fundraising to pay for the very reason why they were there.

Additionally, the Clinic repeatedly requested funds for the purchase and installation of Biohazard Disposal Kiosks – steel, locked mailboxes into which sharps can safely be disposed. Each individual unit costs around $1,500, which includes the cost of purchase, shipping, signage, and installation. The county refused to fund these kiosks (which didn’t stop the Mayor and Police Chief from complaining about the additional biohazard sharps waste around the city), and they were only able to secure funding for a single unit – funding which came notfrom the health department budget, but from the Emergency Medical Technician budget, who were kind enough to supply the funds.

The arguments being made by Mayor Jones and the Police Chief are understandable – there has been an increase in needle waste in the city of Charleston and the surrounding areas…in no small part, because the city steadfastly refused to pony up the funds to install disposal kiosks in these areas.

Additionally, both men argue that the privately run facility – Health Right – is doing a better job of providing the service. Perhaps, this is because each client has to be enrolled and create a paper trail to participate? For anyone who’s ever worked with, done research about, or been around People Who Inject Drugs (PWID), the last thing they want to do is create a paper trail that authorities can use to follow them back to their homes and arrest them for illicit drug use, possession, and possession of paraphernalia. This is why the Kanawha facility had exponentially more clients than Health Right – they weren’t creating a paper trail.

Did the Kanawha/Putnam County Harm Reduction Clinic have its issues? Absolutely. The program operated for barely three years, and there will always be a learning period. But, thanks to the unreasonable efforts of Danny Jones, PWID in those nine counties now get to enjoy traveling even further to obtain clean supplies.

Mark my words – this is going to have a serious deleterious impact on the already-highest-in-the-nation infection rates in the state of West Virginia.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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“OC” Shut Down the County’s Only Syringe Services Program

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

Last week, HEAL Blog covered San Francisco’s multi-pronged approach to dealing with public health among People Who Inject Drugs (PWIDs) and health concerns related to Injection Drug Use (IDU). This week, we’ll visit the southern part of the state – Orange County.

Photo Cover of the OC Weekly

Photo Source: OC Weekly

For those unfamiliar with Orange County, either from the salacious Bravo “reality” series involving housewives, or from Disneyland, the OC is virtually the opposite of all things San Francisco. Long considered a Conservative bastion for the rich and ridiculous, Orange County is home to some of the most ludicrous local regulations and laws – regulating that street lights be turned off by 10 PM to avoid “light pollution;” regulating the length of grass and the design of doors on houses; one town attempted to ban flip-flops. The county has long been the butt of jokes, and deservedly so.

It should, then, come as no surprise, then, that Orange County recently shut down the county’s only Syringe Services Program (SSP) in Santa Ana in January 2018 by denying it a permit (Graham, 2018). This move came after a massive Hepatitis A (HAV) outbreak spanning the southern California coast from San Diego to Los Angeles (between which Orange County lies) primarily within homeless and PWID communities in 2016-2017. At the time, Orange County officials failed to follow the leads of San Diego, Santa Cruz, and Los Angeles Counties in declaring a public health emergency, deciding instead to continue with their protocol of vaccinating and educating their homeless population…which many cities within the county have criminalized (Vo, 2017). Not only did they fail to recognize that the HAV outbreak in surrounding counties could spread to them, they failed to enact any of the proactive sanitation recommendations put forth by the California Health and Human Services that were instituted in San Diego County.

Following this regressive trend, a permit request that would allow the establishment of a mobile SSP in Costa Mesa’s Westside is currently attempting to raise botoxed eyebrows. The justification used by Santa Ana to January permit denial was an “increased number of discarded syringes in the area.” Costa Mesa officials called the proposed mobile SSP a “magnet for drug users” (Fry, 2018).

…because there are no drug users originating from Orange County…

The proposed mobile SSP would serve four Orange County cities – Santa Ana, Anaheim, Orange, and Costa Mesa. These cities were chosen because the Orange County Health Care Agency depicted them as being hotspots for HIV and drug overdoses (Brazil, 2018). Anaheim had the highest number of opioid-related overdose deaths between 2011-2015, followed by Huntington Beach, Santa Ana, Costa Mesa, and Orange. Santa Ana has the highest rate of HIV cases, while Costa Mesa and Orange also have high rates.

Syringe Exchange Program worker providing assistance

Photo Source: LA Times

As for Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis B (HBV), California, as a whole, has relatively low rates of both – 0.2 and 0.3, respectively. Moreover, the state consistently runs behind on issuing annual reports and epidemiological profiles – the most recent HCV report was issued in 2016, and counts only Chronic HCV cases, which is counter to how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) accounts for HCV counts and rates in the U.S. (they count Acute HCV cases, as Chronic HCV is a long-term disease that is hard to track and may take years to develop). When states account for Chronic HCV cases in their reporting, rather than Acute infections, the data tends to skew toward patients within the Birth Cohort – Baby Boomers born between 1945-1965. This inevitably will wind up excluding PWID and homeless populations, as they are less likely to be screening for HCV, and data from virtually every state in the U.S. indicate that PWID who contract HCV trend younger – 15-45.

The justification in Costa Mesa for denying permits to the Orange County Needle Exchange Program – that it will attract drug users to their fair cities – is ludicrous on several fronts, not the least of which is the simple issue of distance. Anyone who’s ever lived in southern California can tell you that it will likely take you an hour or more to get somewhere during the daytime, and that’s if you’re driving. The suggestion that a mobile SSP will somehow draw PWID from neighboring counties – from Los Angeles, San Bernardino, San Diego, or Riverside, all of which are wellout of walking distance – is just ridiculous.

If the Real Housewives of Orange County taught us anything, it’s that keeping up appearances in Orange County is more highly regarded than adequately addressing serious issues. Orange County, rather than being proactive and attempting to directly confront HIV, HBV, and HCV, are instead trying to maintain the façade of a Pleasantville-esque paradise, where the homeless are invisible and drug users mustbe coming from othercounties. It’s a shortsighted approach, destined to produce lackluster results.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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San Francisco: A Case Study in Multi-Pronged Approaches

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

One of the most frequent drums HEAL Blog likes to bang is that epidemics do not occur in siloes. As we learned in Scott County, Indiana, an uptick in new HIV and Hepatitis C (HCV) cases was largely the result of the Injection Drug Use (IDU) of the now-removed-from-the-market prescription opioid drug, Opana. The HIV community has been banging this drum since the 1980s; unfortunately, the politics around IDU were such that Syringe Services Programs (SSPs, or needle exchanges) simply weren’t a politically feasible reality in most of the United States. In other parts of the country, like San Francisco, underground exchanges began in the late-80s, and legalization was relatively quick to follow.

Needle exchange program with volunteers working with injection drug users

Photo Source: 5KPIX CBS

San Francisco’s first underground needle exchange – Prevention Point –  began in 1988 when a group of friends realized that something needed to be done to stop the spread of HIV among People Who Inject Drugs (PWIDs). Against California law, the organizers and volunteers went to great lengths to provide sterile syringes to PWIDs and also partnered with researchers, collecting data to document the positive health benefits programs like theirs could achieve (San Francisco AIDS Foundation, n.d.). Prevention Point operated for four years underground until 1992, when then-mayor Frank Jordan declared a public health emergency in the city of San Francisco and committed $138,000 to Prevention Point. This bold step went a long way to ensuring that SSPs were legalized within the state of California.

Fast-forward to 2018, and again, IDU is again a serious issue in San Francisco. This time, however, the San Francisco Department of Public Health is leading the charge using a variety of integrated initiatives involving:

opioid overdose prevention, education, and the distribution of Naloxone [an opioid overdose reversal drug]; access to and distribution of [sterile] syringes; prevention, screening, and treatment of HIV and HCV; alcohol prevention; and the creation of a Harm Reduction training institute (Chaverneff, 2018).

This multi-pronged approach to dealing with these intertwined epidemics using community-based methods, including peer education and testing models that have proven effective in other settings around the world.

More importantly, their model also includes taking HCV treatment outside of traditional healthcare settings, and helps to provide treatment at an Opiate Treatment Outpatient Program (at University of California San Francisco), at the San Francisco County Jail, at the SF AIDS Foundation Syringe Exchange program, at Magnet (a gay men’s sexual health clinic), at shelters, and in street settings (mobile setups). Of these, the most notable success was that the 10 patients who began HCV therapy in shelters all completed treatment; conversely, less than half of the 100 inmates who began HCV therapy completed treatment (Burk, 2018).

This model has been working for San Francisco, and it has the potential to work around the country, as well.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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