Tag Archives: Injection Drug Users

“OC” Shut Down the County’s Only Syringe Services Program

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

Last week, HEAL Blog covered San Francisco’s multi-pronged approach to dealing with public health among People Who Inject Drugs (PWIDs) and health concerns related to Injection Drug Use (IDU). This week, we’ll visit the southern part of the state – Orange County.

Photo Cover of the OC Weekly

Photo Source: OC Weekly

For those unfamiliar with Orange County, either from the salacious Bravo “reality” series involving housewives, or from Disneyland, the OC is virtually the opposite of all things San Francisco. Long considered a Conservative bastion for the rich and ridiculous, Orange County is home to some of the most ludicrous local regulations and laws – regulating that street lights be turned off by 10 PM to avoid “light pollution;” regulating the length of grass and the design of doors on houses; one town attempted to ban flip-flops. The county has long been the butt of jokes, and deservedly so.

It should, then, come as no surprise, then, that Orange County recently shut down the county’s only Syringe Services Program (SSP) in Santa Ana in January 2018 by denying it a permit (Graham, 2018). This move came after a massive Hepatitis A (HAV) outbreak spanning the southern California coast from San Diego to Los Angeles (between which Orange County lies) primarily within homeless and PWID communities in 2016-2017. At the time, Orange County officials failed to follow the leads of San Diego, Santa Cruz, and Los Angeles Counties in declaring a public health emergency, deciding instead to continue with their protocol of vaccinating and educating their homeless population…which many cities within the county have criminalized (Vo, 2017). Not only did they fail to recognize that the HAV outbreak in surrounding counties could spread to them, they failed to enact any of the proactive sanitation recommendations put forth by the California Health and Human Services that were instituted in San Diego County.

Following this regressive trend, a permit request that would allow the establishment of a mobile SSP in Costa Mesa’s Westside is currently attempting to raise botoxed eyebrows. The justification used by Santa Ana to January permit denial was an “increased number of discarded syringes in the area.” Costa Mesa officials called the proposed mobile SSP a “magnet for drug users” (Fry, 2018).

…because there are no drug users originating from Orange County…

The proposed mobile SSP would serve four Orange County cities – Santa Ana, Anaheim, Orange, and Costa Mesa. These cities were chosen because the Orange County Health Care Agency depicted them as being hotspots for HIV and drug overdoses (Brazil, 2018). Anaheim had the highest number of opioid-related overdose deaths between 2011-2015, followed by Huntington Beach, Santa Ana, Costa Mesa, and Orange. Santa Ana has the highest rate of HIV cases, while Costa Mesa and Orange also have high rates.

Syringe Exchange Program worker providing assistance

Photo Source: LA Times

As for Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis B (HBV), California, as a whole, has relatively low rates of both – 0.2 and 0.3, respectively. Moreover, the state consistently runs behind on issuing annual reports and epidemiological profiles – the most recent HCV report was issued in 2016, and counts only Chronic HCV cases, which is counter to how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) accounts for HCV counts and rates in the U.S. (they count Acute HCV cases, as Chronic HCV is a long-term disease that is hard to track and may take years to develop). When states account for Chronic HCV cases in their reporting, rather than Acute infections, the data tends to skew toward patients within the Birth Cohort – Baby Boomers born between 1945-1965. This inevitably will wind up excluding PWID and homeless populations, as they are less likely to be screening for HCV, and data from virtually every state in the U.S. indicate that PWID who contract HCV trend younger – 15-45.

The justification in Costa Mesa for denying permits to the Orange County Needle Exchange Program – that it will attract drug users to their fair cities – is ludicrous on several fronts, not the least of which is the simple issue of distance. Anyone who’s ever lived in southern California can tell you that it will likely take you an hour or more to get somewhere during the daytime, and that’s if you’re driving. The suggestion that a mobile SSP will somehow draw PWID from neighboring counties – from Los Angeles, San Bernardino, San Diego, or Riverside, all of which are wellout of walking distance – is just ridiculous.

If the Real Housewives of Orange County taught us anything, it’s that keeping up appearances in Orange County is more highly regarded than adequately addressing serious issues. Orange County, rather than being proactive and attempting to directly confront HIV, HBV, and HCV, are instead trying to maintain the façade of a Pleasantville-esque paradise, where the homeless are invisible and drug users mustbe coming from othercounties. It’s a shortsighted approach, destined to produce lackluster results.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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Trump’s War on the Poor is a War Against Us

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

On April 10th, current President, Donald J. Trump, fired the latest Republican salvo against the poor and social welfare programs by signing an executive order intended to force recipients of food assistance, Medicaid, and low-income housing subsidies to “get a job” or lose their benefits. A question that has yet to be answered is whether or not this edict will apply to recipients of Ryan White benefits, which provide low- or no-cost HIV medications, medical and dental treatment coverage, and other ancillary, yet vital services to an estimated 52% of people diagnosed with HIV in the United States (Health Resources and Services Administration, 2016). Those co-infected with Hepatitis C (HCV), whose cure requires treatment with some of the most expensive drugs on the market, are likely to be harmed, as well.

Make no mistake – this latest royal decr…executive order – unironically titled, “Reducing Poverty in America” – is specifically designed notto actuallypull people up out of poverty, but to force the “undeserving” off of the public dole. The order is directed at “any program that provides means-tested assistance or other assistance that provides benefits to people, households, or families that have low incomes” (Thrush, 2018). This is concerning for healthcare advocates, because the qualification for Ryan White services is predicated upon “means-tested assistance.” Essentially, how much money you make determines if you’re eligible for coverage.

Recent HCV incidence and prevalence reports indicate that an increasing number of new infectious occur in rural and suburban areas of the country, with higher rates of infection occurring in Injection Drug Users, particularly in people aged 18-45, and in areas where unemployment is high, educational achievement is lower, and access to healthcare services often faces several barriers. Essentially, HCV is prevalent among people and in places that are poor; people who often rely upon means-tested assistance to pay for healthcare.

As with virtually every Republican-initiated attempt to “reform” social services programs, this is a solution looking for a problem. Roughly 60% of working age, non-elderly Medicaid enrollees are working; plus, nearly 8 in 10 –  recipients (78%) live in families where at least one person works (Garfield, et al, 2018). The statistics are similar for recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)…  And for WIC…  And for virtually every other social safety net program.

76% of Louisiana's Medicaid expansion enrollees are working, caring for family members, or in school.

Photo Source: Louisiana Budget Project

Ryan White recipients, in particular, face an undue burden, as income requirements – particularly in more conservative states – are so low that working virtually any job will make them ineligible to receive coverage for medications that are prohibitively expensive. This will apply to both those mono-infected with HIV and co-infected with HCV.  For those receiving Medicaid, the burden will be just as high.

All of this stems from the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), a percentage of which determines eligibility for these means-tested programs. For an individual, the FPL is $12,140 per year in 2018. This means that an individual must make that amount, or less, to be considered “in poverty” in the United States. In states that expanded their Medicaid programs, most raised that qualification limit to 138% percent of the FPL ($16,753). The FPL percentage for Ryan White varies wildly from state to state.

This places potential recipients in a terrible position: At the current Federal Minimum Wage ($7.50/hour), an individual working 40 hours a week for 52 weeks will have an annual income of $15,080. If they cross this threshold by even a few hundred dollars, it makes them ineligible for the program, but still leaves them unable to afford the basic cost of living, much less any insurance premiums or medications they may have added to their monthly expenditures. Even with a second income, which would likely make them ineligible for services because they make “too much money,” the cost of living is so far removed from how the FPL is set, no person can reasonably expect to subsist off of that amount for any extended period of time in a First World country.

Adding work requirements to social programs also poses a logistical reality: simply demanding that “able-bodied” people “get jobs” doesn’t magically create jobs for there to be gotten. Nor are these requirements bolstered by any additional wraparound services, such as increased infrastructure spending to extend public transportation services out to far-flung locales, transportation assistance funds to cover the cost of fuel or low-cost public transportation passes.

The reality is that these “cost-saving” measures (ultimately designed to purge these programs of ‘undeserving’ recipients) will result in immeasurable costs that will be paid in human lives.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

 

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Appalachia’s Opioid Addiction Continues Wreaking Health Havoc

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

The Northern Kentucky Health Department (NKHD) has reported a 48% increase in new HIV infections in the region in 2017, with 37 new cases compared to 25 in 2016. In 18 of those 37 cases (48.6%), Injection Drug Use (IDU) was listed as a primary risk factor, compared to just 5 of the 25 cases in 2016 (20%). Further analysis of these data show that the IDU-related new infections were concentrated in just two of the region’s four counties – Campbell and Kenton (Northern Kentucky Health Department, 2018).

Whenever a jump in new HIV infections occurs in Appalachia, I say to myself, “THIS! THIS will be our teachable moment! THIS will be the one that forces [state] to take action!” And, a lot of the time, I’m partially correct. The most common refrain I hear when asking state and local healthcare officials about potential HIV outbreaks is, “We don’t want this to be another Scott County, Indiana.”

Sihe HIV outbreak in Scott County, IN in 2015 (Hopkins, 2017) that saw the county’s number of new HIV infections jump from 5 per year to 216 in two years, states all across American and even the Federal government began taking actions to prevent a similar outbreak. In 2016, Congress partially lifted the ban on Federal funding for Syringe Services Programs (SSPs) – a move once thought virtually impossible given the political climate (All Things Considered, 2016). The Scott County outbreak served as a cautionary tale in state run by Conservatives – “It’s time to get with the times.”

Two hands, with one hold a needle

Photo Source: TheBody.com

Of the 18 IDU-related HIV infections, 78% were co-infected with Hepatitis C (Monks, 2018). Increases in new cases of Hepatitis C (HCV) are often the “canary in the coal mine) that leads healthcare professionals to begin more rigorous screening for HIV, particularly in areas of the country where the incidences of prescription opioid and/or heroin abuse are particularly rampant. Unlike the heroin epidemic of the 1970s, the new opioid epidemic of the modern millennium is set in rural and suburban areas of the country. Of the 220 counties identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as being vulnerable to HIV or HCV outbreaks, 56% are in Kentucky, Tennessee, and West Virginia – the states that rank in the top four rates of Hepatitis B and HCV infections in the U.S. (Whalen & Campo-Flores, 2018).

Across the Ohio River from the Northern Kentucky Independent District, in Cincinnati, the city saw a 40% increase in new HIV infections over 2016, with a total of 129 new infections, 28 of which (22%) were IDU-related (Whalen & Campo-Flores).

HEAL Blog will continue to monitor the situation in Northern Kentucky. After all, nobody wants to be the next Scott County, Indiana

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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Food and Drug Administration Pulls Opana ER from Shelves

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

In April 2016, HEAL Blog wrote an entry about the fascinating and heartbreaking first episode of National Public Radio’s (NPR) series, Embedded. Host Kelly McEvers found a group of prescription opioid Injection Drug Users (IDUs) who allowed her to record an audio interview about their lives and how they use their drugs. The drug in question was Endo Pharmaceuticals’ powerful prescription opioid, Opana ER (McEvers, 2016). A little over a year after this broadcast, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reached the conclusion that the “…benefits of the drug may no longer outweigh the risks,” and have asked Endo to remove Opana ER from the market (Mandal, 2017).

What’s at stake here isn’t just a 4% increase in prescription opioid overdose deaths in 2016 (n=17,536), nor the 23% increase in heroin-related deaths (n=12,989); it’s not even the 73% increase in synthetic opioid-related deaths (n=9,580) (Stobbe, 2016). What’s at stake, at least for Endo Pharmaceuticals, is the $158 million in sales Opana ER brought in for Endo in 2016 – a 10% decrease from 2015 (Mandal). For Endo, pulling one of their most successful products from the market means a huge hit to their bottom line.

Opana ER pill bottle

Photo Source: Medcitynews.com

Opana ER, first introduced by Endo in 2006, was reformulated in 2012, when the manufacturers began adding a plastic coating to the outside of the pill to make it “abuse deterrent.” This move, while initially praised by the FDA and lawmakers as a great step forward to combating prescription drug abuse and addiction, simply shifted how drug users abused the drug. While the initial formulation could be crushed and easily snorted nasally, the plastic coating prevented this practice. Necessity (read: addiction) being the mother of invention, drug users found a way to abuse the drug by melting the plastic coating off, filtering the coating out through mesh, load the liquefied drug into a syringe, and injecting it straight into their bloodstreams. The McEvers Embedded piece literally goes over a step-by-step “How To” guide that is already known by IDUs.

The bottom line for states, counties, and municipalities who are having to cope with the 40,105 opioid drug-related deaths in 2016 comes down to more than just money – the issue is negatively impacting virtually every arena of daily life. Families are rent asunder, children are left orphaned, and emergency personnel are facing their own increased risk of overdose from inhaling or coming into direct contact with the powerful synthetic opioids, fentanyl and carfentanil, during overdose calls and drug busts. The risk of overdose due to exposure is so great that the Drug Enforcement Agency just this month issued a safety guide for first responders who might come into contact (Chanen, 2017).

Pain advocates who have long pushed for easy access to prescription painkillers argue that increasing restrictions places an undue burden upon patients who properly adhere to treatment regimens, using powerful prescription opioids as prescribed. To their way of thinking, regulations and prescribing limits unfairly limits the ability of those who live with chronic pain to function and/or go about their daily lives. Pain advocacy groups (many of which are conveniently funded by the very pharmaceutical companies whose drugs are at risk) have repeatedly, and in many cases successfully, lobbied state and Federal legislators to prevent the passage of any legislation that might hinder their access to these drugs.

I don’t buy it, and apparently, neither does the FDA. Endo Pharmaceuticals have said they’re “…evaluating the options and reviewing the situation to opt for an appropriate path forward.” Should the company refuse to remove the product voluntarily (as the FDA has asked), the agency intends to take steps to formally require its removal by withdrawing approval (Kean, 2017).

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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Generational Stigmata and HCV

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

When it comes to Hepatitis C (HCV), people in America have long assumed that it was (and is) a Baby Boomer problem. Recent statistics, however, indicate that a rapidly increasing number of new HCV diagnoses are linked to Injection Drug Use (IDU), and that IDUs will likely lead to an exponential explosion of new infections compared to previous years. With that reporting, however, a stigma has arisen amongst the Baby Boomer population (the Birth Cohort), leading some in the cohort to avoid screening for the disease. Research published in March 2016 (Joy, 2016), however, indicates that HCV infections within the Birth Cohort is much more likely to have arisen from unsafe medical practices on behalf of doctors and hospitals, rather than any lifestyle choices made on the part of patients.

The research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, was conducted by scouring over 45,000 documents and records, examining 45,316 sequences of HCV Genotype 1a – the most common strain – and then used a technique called “phylogentic analysis” to focus on five HCV genes and trace the dynamics of the HCV epidemic. The results suggest that the initial peak of the HCV epidemic – the time when initial infection and introduction of the disease in the Birth Cohort – occurred between 1948 and 1963, far earlier than many had suggested.

These infections are most likely related to the techniques and equipment that medical professionals used in the post-World War II (WWII) era, prior to the establishment of safer technologies, equipment, blood screening, and techniques that came about in the wake of the initial HIV crisis of the 1980s and 1990s. Strict blood screening techniques were not, in fact, common place until the U.S. government mandated the practice in 1992. As such, anyone who received a blood transfusion or underwent invasive medical procedures prior to that year may have been exposed to HCV, and should be screened for the virus.

Stigmata are nothing new, however, for the Birth Cohort. This is a group who helped to push the sexual revolution and drug use of the 1960s and 70s, and began having children in the 1980s. During this time, reports of sexually transmitted diseases and viruses, as well as transmission via IDU, began gaining more media exposure, both of which gained a level of ignominy in the 1980s in relation to HIV. We must remember that many media reports indicated that HIV only impacted those in the “4 ‘H’ Club” – Heroin users, Hookers, Haitians, and Homosexuals. When this type of branding in the media and in government conversations occurs, stigmata arise that leads to people avoiding testing and treatment.

Since that time, however, infectious diseases have undergone something of facelift, with multi-million-dollar ad campaigns and outreach programs on the part of pharmaceutical companies and governments trying to spread the word about getting tested. These efforts are part of a concerted effort to reduce the stigma associated with chronic illnesses and infectious diseases that are both costly to treat and incredibly harmful to those living with them if they go untreated.

For the Birth Cohort, however, to feel as if they should be lumped in with what many view as an unsavory crowd simply goes counter to the reality of the epidemic. Screening for HCV isn’t just something that applies to those who practice risky behavioral patterns; rather, it should be something that is routine within the Birth Cohort, so that they can cure HCV and live their waning years without the concern of HCV-related illnesses and co-morbidities.

References:

  • Joy, J., McCloskey, R., Nguyen, T., Liang, R., Khudyakov, Y., & Olmstead, A., et al. (2016, March 30). The spread of hepatitis C virus genotype 1a in North America: a retrospective phylogenetic study. The Lancet Infectious Diseases16(6), 698-702. doi:10.1016/s1473-3099(16)00124-9. Retrieved from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(16)00124-9

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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Hepatic in the Heartland

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) issued, this month, the state’s most recent epidemiological profile for Hepatitis C (HCV), and that profile isn’t looking good for people under the age of 30. Between 2010 and 2015, people between the ages of 18-30 have seen a 300% increase in new HCV infections (IDPH, 2017a). New HCV infections amongst all ages saw a 48.70% increase over that same period.

For nearly thirty years, the conventional wisdom has been that HCV is a Baby Boomer disease, and that, outside of the occasional People Who Inject Drugs (PWIDs), there is really no need to screen other groups for infection. What that preconceived notion failed to account for was a resurgence in popularity of heroin as the drug of choice and the resultant increase in Injection Drug Use (IDU). Moreover, the setting of heroin use has largely shifted away from being an urban problem that impacts mostly minority communities to one that’s plaguing suburban and rural areas where access to comprehensive healthcare and recovery services lags behind the more urban settings with which the heroin addiction has historically been associated.

The IDPH report indicates that IDU accounts for 68% of all new HCV infections, and that 55% of Iowans living with HCV live in one of six counties: Polk, Linn, Scott, Woodbury, Pottawattamie, and Black Hawk. Though these counties are among the most populous in Iowa, the state is, itself, relatively rural in comparison to its neighbors. In the IDPH HCV Fact Sheets, the increase in new infections amongst younger Iowans is specifically tied to IDU, indicating that ER visits for opioid and heroin overdoses increased 253% and 2,500%, respectively (IDPH, 2017b).

Randy Mayer, Chief of the IDPH Bureau of HIV, STD, and Hepatitis puts a positive spin on the report:

“These data indicate that Iowans are getting tested and referred to treatment by their medical providers. Everyone born between 1945 and 1965 and anyone who has ever injected non-prescription drugs, even once, should be tested for hepatitis C (Bunge, 2017).”

This is the first report by the IDPH to look at incidences of HCV in Iowa, and Mayer adds that, while this is the first attempt to pull together various data from around the state, the IDPH has been watching similar reports out of Appalachia, and as such paid additional attention to people under 30 (Shotwell, 2017).

This inaugural report from the IDPH does a lot of things “right,” my personal favorite being the use of APA citation, rather than MLA, allowing for in-text citations, rather than footnotes. Writing stylistic approach aside, the report does a fantastic job of indicating which areas Iowan medical professionals need to watch and where interventions most need to be made, as well as indicating that follow-up after treatment is necessary to avoid re-infection.

References:

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

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Heroin and Hepatitis Go Hand in Hand

HEAL Blog is the recipient of the ADAP Advocacy Association’s 2015-2016 ADAP Social Media Campaign of the Year Award
By: Marcus J. Hopkins, Blogger

Over the past year, HEAL Blog has paid a lot of attention to heroin, particularly in relation to the massive increase in heroin and prescription opioid overdoses in Appalachia, the Midwest, and the Northeast. While the purpose of HEAL – “HEAL” standing for “Hepatitis: Education, Advocacy, and Leadership” – is to specifically address issues related to Viral Hepatitis, and particularly Hepatitis C (HCV), when we cover issues related to prescription opioid abuse and heroin, we sometimes fail to connect the dots between the two topics. There is, in fact, a very high correlation between Injection Drug Use (IDU), People Who Inject Drugs (PWIDs), and the transmission of HCV: most new HCV infections in the three previously listed regions are related to IDU.

Sources of Infection for Persons with Hepatitis C

Photo Source: Pinterest

HCV and HCV-related co-morbidities (e.g. – Cirrhosis, Advanced Liver Disease) kill more Americans each year than any other infectious disease (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016). It is also one of the most expensive diseases to treat, with Direct Acting Agent (DAA) drug Wholesale Acquisition Costs (WACs) ranging between $50,000 and $100,000 for twelve weeks of treatment. This makes preventing the spread of HCV not only a matter of physical health, but one of fiscal health.

Despite pharmaceutical manufacturers’ arguments that the one-time cost of a regimen to achieve a Sustained Virologic Response (SVR – “cure”) is far cheaper than the long-term costs of other diseases, not to mention the long-term costs that arise if HCV goes untreated, state and Federal healthcare budget departments remain unconvinced. Budgeting processes generally focus on a single year, rather than accounting for multi-year spending, so arguing that long-term expenditures “cost” more hasn’t been an effective argument. Even with the clandestine pricing agreements and rebates – clandestine, because they are not made public due to “trade secrets” laws – states have yet to begin treating every HCV-infected client on their government-funded rosters. To do so would blow through entire pharmacy budgets several times over, in many states.

With PWIDs representing the highest number of new HCV infections between the ages of 18-35, state legislatures are starting to come around to the realization that the best way to avoid spending that money on expensive treatments is to put into place Harm Reduction measures that are shown to prevent the spread of blood borne illnesses. As it is very difficult and unfeasible to stop IDU, syringe exchanges can be put into place that allow PWIDs to inject using clean needles, rather than sharing them.

Syringe exchanges have, for much of the past forty years, been largely reviled by politically conservative politicians and states; many Republican politicians have repeatedly argued that state-sponsored syringe exchanges will only encourage bad behavior, serving as a tacit endorsement of IDU. Now that prescription opioid and heroin abuse has moved outside of the urban areas and into the suburban and rural areas that serve as bastions of the Conservative ideal, suddenly, these politicians are coming around to the idea.

Medical technician counting needles.

Photo Source: Daily Beast

In the past two years, several considerably conservative states have passed laws allowing syringe exchanges to be established – Indiana, North Carolina, Ohio, and Virginia, to name a few – largely in response to a relative explosion of new HIV and HCV infections related to IDU. The problems that politicians and their constituents once relegated to the big cities have come to their quiet towns, and have done so right under their noses. The lessons out of Scott County, Indiana, where nearly 200 people tested positive for HIV near the end of 2015 and into 2016, are still reverberating throughout the region, and people are starting to look at ways to prevent the spread of disease, rather than punish the behavior.

It is clear that the opioid and heroin abuse epidemic is not going away, anytime soon. Since we aren’t likely to stop currently addicted people from injecting drugs, the smartest path forward is to at least make certain they can do so safely.

References:

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2016, May 04). Hepatitis C Kills More Americans than Any Other Infectious Disease. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Newsroom Home: Press Materials: CDC Newsroom Releases. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p0504-hepc-mortality.html

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Disclaimer: HEAL Blogs do not necessarily reflect the views of the Community Access National Network (CANN), but rather they provide a neutral platform whereby the author serves to promote open, honest discussion about Hepatitis-related issues and updates. Please note that the content of some of the HEAL Blogs might be graphic due to the nature of the issues being addressed in it.

 

 

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